Authentic8 Blog Category: GDPR

Ideas That Become Obvious In Hindsight

Interview: Authentic8 Co-founder and CEO Scott Petry on Leo Laporte's TWiT.tv

Were you excited when Apple presented the Newton mobile device to the world, a glimpse into a future starring the iPhone? Or perhaps relieved when the email Spam Wars were won by Postini, a Silicon Valley startup later bought by Google, where it became the core of Gmail?

The ideas and concepts that drove both breakthrough innovations initially faced ridicule (in the case of Newton) and skepticism. What they have in common is that today, they are obvious in hindsight.

What they also share is a name: Scott Petry. His career took him from Apple's Newton team to founding and later selling Postini - which solved the email spam problem - to Google and from there to his current role as Co-founder and CEO of Authentic8, which pioneered remote browser isolation in the cloud.

Do we have a theme here? Leo Laporte thinks so. The award-winning tech journalist and founder

GDPR Outlook: After First Record Fines, What’s Next?

Following the record penalties for Google, British Airways and Marriott under the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) by French and British data privacy commissioners, which industry or sector will the EU's privacy watchdogs home in on next?

European GDPR enforcement actions are just getting up to speed. All indications point to more rough waters ahead for large transnationals with a presence in the EU.

In their third conversation on the state of GDPR, Scott Petry, co-founder and CEO of Authentic8, explores with Steve Durbin, Managing Director of the UK-based Information Security Forum (ISF)

  • what impact Brexit may have on GDPR enforcement in the UK
  • how the EU is currently taking aim for the next salvo of sanctions against GDPR violators
  • why apps and tools that touch EU employee data face increased scrutiny.

Will the next headline-worthy penalty hit a US-based company for not sufficiently protecting its EU employee data? Listen to their discussion here:

Did you miss the first two

GDPR: A Letter from Elizabeth Denham

Elizabeth Denham.

If your company is doing business in Europe, put that name on top of the list of people you’ll not want to hear from in their official capacity.

Just ask BA (British Airways) or Marriott International. Both encountered data breaches that put millions of their customers at risk. Now, they’ve both received notice from Ms. Denham that they’ll be fined the record amounts of $ 230 million and $ 125 million, respectively, under the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Elizabeth Denham heads up the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) of the United Kingdom. Yes, the recipients of her notice of intent may appeal the decision. And no, observers don’t expect the ICO to reduce these first GDPR penalties against major international corporations to the proverbial slap on the wrist.

To the contrary. GDPR applies to all companies, including in the US, that store or process data of EU citizens and residents. The EU’s privacy commissioners

GDPR in the US: After the British Airways Hack

British Airways (BA) announced in September that it had fallen victim to a hack that affected the personal data of 380,000 passengers. The BA hack could be the first prominent test case for the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that went into effect in May.

How has GDPR impacted U.S.-based companies so far? Are they prepared for EU regulators cracking down on cross-border data protection failures and privacy violations? The BA attackers exploited a third-party vulnerability in the airline’s digital supply chain, taking a path we recently examined on this blog. What are the lessons to learn from the British Airways data breach?

On our Silo Sessions podcast, Authentic8 Co-founder and CEO Scott Petry discussed these questions as part of his ongoing GDPR conversation with Steve Durbin, Managing Director of the Information Security Forum (ISF).

P.S.: This Silo Sessions episode was recorded before the disclosure of the latest security breach at Facebook, a theft

Fed Up? Fire Up This Cloud Browser.

The Facebook/Cambridge Analytica fiasco did not happen overnight or by “mistake”, as Facebook wants users to believe. The price of “free” services and apps online means the loss of data protection, privacy and transparency.

This isn’t a new phenomenon, it’s not limited to Facebook, and it should not be a surprise to anyone. Venture investment in companies building businesses around “eyeballs” and “clicks” had to convert to hard cash at some point, and that point is the monetization of user data.

In contrast, Authentic8’s cloud browser Silo was built on the trust of its users. How do we honor that trust? We think you have a right to know what we do with your data. But first, some background.

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So Mark has admitted “mistakes” on behalf of Facebook. As did Marissa before him, for Yahoo. And don’t forget Richard (who?), who apologized - kinda, sorta - for Equifax. And so on…

Did it change anything that these