Authentic8 Blog Category: Federal

Authentic8 Supports the Defense Entrepreneurs Forum

There is no organization more focused on creating permeability between the public and private sectors than the Defense Entrepreneurs Forum (DEF).

Authentic8 and DEF have many things in common, and none more than a shared commitment to supporting national defense through creative problem solving, productivity enhancement, and deliberate partnership. For that reason, we will be sponsoring the upcoming DEF 2019 Annual National Conference.

DEF & Authentic8

While Silo Cloud Browser by Authentic8 is designed to create a perfect isolation layer between users and the web, we as a company, like DEF, are dedicated to bringing diverse groups together and breaking down barriers. In essence, we both see that the path toward responsible collaboration is through connecting silos (pun intended).

We look forward to an enduring relationship with DEF as we commit to a more visible role in supporting its mission.

TRON and Transition

As those of us who have served in the military for a significant period of time can attest, we begin to take certain things for granted. The sense of belonging, the pride of being part of something much bigger than ourselves, and the ability to impact the lives of many were among my greatest gratifications as a military officer.

As I navigated my transition after 27 years of service, the potential of feeling a void in any of those areas was not acceptable. Fortunately, I was able to find a team that allows me to experience a similar sense of fulfillment and gratification. Two short years ago, I was serving as Commanding Officer of a team that remains customers of the team of which I am now a part. The path from customer to Authentic8er was not foreseen but it makes perfect sense now that I am here.

We stumbled across Authentic8’s Silo platform in 2016 when we decided we wanted

Federal Tech Talk: Secure Web Browsing

You may have heard that browsers were not designed with security in mind. Originally created to make the internet more accessible for scientists, the "free" browser soon morphed into a tool that helped advertisers and marketers turn its users into the product.

The rest is (web) history. In the traditional browser ecosystem, consumers pay for their "free" browser with ad clicks and their online usage data. Inherently insecure browsers have become ubiquitous - even in the federal government and its organizations, where taxpayers expect security to be more than an afterthought.

The high price "free" browsers elicit from federal organizations, in terms of weakened IT security and data protection, was the topic of a recent conversation between John Gilroy, host of Federal News Network's podcast Federal Tech Talk, and Thom Kaye, Federal Program Manager at Authentic8.

One highlight of their insightful exchange on How the browser betrays your organization: Thom explains how location data disclosed by

Why You Should Be Fed Up With the Cycle of FUD

The upcoming election has created the perfect opportunity for the $100 billion cybersecurity industry to throw some fear, uncertainty and doubt — colloquially known as “FUD” — into the daily conversation.

Vendors see this as an opportunity to double down on their marketing to help congressional offices “defend democracy.” But they’re selling the same solutions that got these offices in trouble in the first place. Isn’t it time to try a different approach?

It’s important to understand that unlike other branches of government, each congressional office is responsible for their own security when it comes to their IT infrastructure. In many instances, offices outsource management of their systems to contracting agencies, which contributes to the problem.

Additionally, congressional offices and political parties were targets long before the industry took notice. Party staff are juicy targets for social engineering, phishing, and other forms of targeted attacks from APT groups. Stealing the data they’re holding can be a windfall for political adversaries

DOD Looks to the Cloud for Browser Security

The US Department of Defense just published its cloud browser strategy. What's yours?

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On June 5, 2018, the Defense Information Systems Agency released an unclassified request for information (RFI) outlining its intent to procure a cloud browser for 3.1 million Department of Defense (DOD) employees.

The operators of the most-targeted network in the world have concluded that they'd be more secure and efficient if they kept all public web code off the department's network.

This is significant for the entire cybersecurity market, not just the DOD. With this RFI, an arguably niche, disruptive security solution becomes mainstream. Cloud browsers are now something any organization concerned with online security must consider.

DOD personnel use the web for mission-related activities, support and logistics functions, and morale and well-being. With more than 4 million users worldwide, and with many people operating out of sensitive government facilities, the DOD is also a compelling target for cyberattack. The volume of attacks the department must deal with